A biography of the early life black civil rights struggles and assassination of malcolm x

Visit Website After the eighth grade, Malcolm dropped out of school, headed for a life of crime.

A biography of the early life black civil rights struggles and assassination of malcolm x

Unlike many other African American leaders of this time, who supported nonviolent methods, Malcolm X believed in using more aggressive measures in the fight for civil rights.

His father, a Baptist minister, was an outspoken follower of Marcus Garvey —the black nationalist leader. Garvey supported a "back-to-Africa" movement for African Americans. They moved from Omaha, Nebraska, after being threatened by the Ku Klux Klan, a group that believes that white people are superior to all other races.

While living in an all-white neighborhood in Michigan their house was burned. When Malcolm was six years old, his father was mysteriously murdered. The black community was convinced that white people had committed the crime. By the s the nation had fallen into the Great Depression, a decade-long period of great economic hardship.

For a time his mother and her eight children lived on public welfare. When his mother became mentally ill, Malcolm was sent to a foster home. His mother remained in a mental institution for about twenty-six years. The children were divided among several families, and Malcolm lived in various state institutions and boardinghouses.

At thirteen Malcolm was charged with delinquency behaving in a way that is against the law and was sent to a juvenile detention home a place where young people are held in custody. He dropped out of school at the age of fifteen. A criminal life Living with his sister in Boston, Massachusetts, Malcolm worked as a shoeshine boy, a busboy, and a waiter.

In Boston Malcolm began visiting the black ghetto an area of a city where a minority lives of Roxbury. He began wearing flashy clothing and jumped into a criminal life that included gambling, selling drugs, and burglary. He adapted well to the New York City street life and rose quickly in the criminal world.

Malcolm became known as Detroit Red, for his red shock of hair. When the police uncovered his criminal activities, Malcolm returned to Boston. Reformed in prison Inat the age of twenty, Malcolm was sentenced to ten years in prison for burglary. While in prison he began to transform his life.

He began reading books on history, philosophy, and religion. In prison his brother Reginald visited him and told Malcolm about the Black Muslims. The leader of the group was Elijah Muhammad — These teachings taught that the white man is evil and doomed by Allah to destruction.

A biography of the early life black civil rights struggles and assassination of malcolm x

Also, the teachings stressed that the best course for black people is to separate themselves from Western, white civilization—culturally, politically, physically, and psychologically.

The Black Muslim teachings also prohibited personal habits such as smoking, drinking, and the eating of pork. In addition Malcolm X. There he was accepted into the movement and given the name of Malcolm X.

Malcolm believed the "X" represented his "slave" name that was forever lost after being raised in a mainly white nation. Malcolm X became assistant minister of the Detroit Mosque, or Muslim house of worship.

The following year he returned to Chicago to study personally under Muhammad, and shortly thereafter was sent to organize a mosque in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In he went to lead the mosque in Harlem.

As the voice of the organization he was a speech-writer, a philosopher, and an inspiring speaker who was often quoted by the media.Malcolm X was a prominent figure during the Civil Rights era.

Offering an alternative view to the mainstream Civil Rights movement, Malcolm X advocated for both the establishment of a separate black community (rather than integration) and the use of violence in self-defense (rather than non-violence).

African American civil rights leader Malcolm X was a major twentieth-century spokesman for black nationalism. Unlike many other African American leaders of this time, who supported nonviolent methods, Malcolm X believed in using more aggressive measures in the fight for civil urbanagricultureinitiative.com: Feb 21, Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, in Omaha, Nebraska.

His mother, Louise Norton Little, was a homemaker occupied with the family’s eight children. His father, Earl Little, was an outspoken Baptist minister and avid supporter of Black Nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. In addition to seeking the assistance of African governments and national liberation movements in the struggle of African Americans, Malcolm X, like William Patterson, Paul Robeson and W.E.B.

Du Bois of the Civil Rights Congress in , sought to take the plight of African Americans before the United Nations, seeking sanctions against the . Watch video · February 21st marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Malcolm X.

On this occasion, take a look back at this African-American civil rights activist’s life and legacy. Oct 29,  · Malcolm X, theactivist and outspoken public voice of the Black Muslim faith, challenged the mainstream civil rights movement and the nonviolent pursuit of integration championed by Martin Luther.

The life and struggles of Malcolm X | The Ethnologist