An analysis of the windhover a poem by gerard manley hopkins

It is a usual Hopkinsian sonnet that begins with description of nature and ends in meditation about God and Christ and his beauty, greatness and grace. Hopkins Hopkins has mixed his romantic fascination with the nature with his religious favor of gratitude towards God for giving us a beautiful nature.

An analysis of the windhover a poem by gerard manley hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins Source Hopkins and The Windhover The Windhover is one of the best known sonnets by Gerard Manley Hopkins and was inspired by the sight of a small falcon, a kestrel, which often faces against the wind to hover above its prey.

Hence the alternative name of windhover. More significant however is the transformation of the bird into a spiritual symbol of Christ. As a Jesuit priest Hopkins was clear in his belief that the beauty in Nature mirrored the beauty of God.

Much of his poetry was created in order to find a way to God, through the Christ figure. Through observation and contemplation Hopkins was able to fulfil one of the spiritual exercises he practiced, created by Ignatius, founder of the Society of Jesus.

Study of the natural world in particular inspired his poetry, which he hoped would express the love he had for beauty. My heart in hiding Stirred for a bird, — the achieve of, the mastery of the thing! Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle!

AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier! No wonder of it: Analysis The Windhover is a sonnet of fourteen lines. The octet eight lines is separate from the sestet six lines signifying a change or turn in the meaning of the whole.

Note the full end rhymes of the octet: The sestet has a slightly different rhyming sequence: So the change in this second part of the sonnet is a definite break from what has gone before. Hopkins developed a language of his own to help describe the inner rhythmic world of the poem he had created.

He used the word inscape to denote the unique characteristics of a poem, its essence, and the word instress which conveys the experience a person has of the inscape.

An analysis of the windhover a poem by gerard manley hopkins

This metrical system is based on abrupt use of strong stresses followed by unstressed, the energy of the stresses springing through the alliterative syllables that make up the rest of the line. So for example, from line 2: Further Analysis This poem is best read out loud several times, only then will the ear become accustomed to the rhythms and sound patterns of these complex but beautiful lines.

What strikes from the outset is the amount of alliteration and assonance throughout - the poet is showing off somewhat, which could be a reflection of the action of the falcon, a master of the air.

The use of the simple past I caught suggests caught sight of, but could also imply the act of catching, as when a falcon is caught by the falconer. By splitting the word kingdom at the end of the first line the poet introduces enjambment, a natural way of pausing whilst sustaining the sense; king also implies the regal authority of the bird.

The poet is also reinforcing the idea of wonder, for here is a predatory bird manipulating the wind in a light that seems to set it on fire. Could it be that the alliteration suspends time as the reader catches breath to finish the line? Note however that, within the many lines that suspend then run and hold on by a thread, the end rhymes keep everything in order, they stop the whole bursting out or breaking: When you read through the poem a number of times, these full end rhymes become crucial, as does the use of enjambment, the running of one line into another, to maintain the sense.

Analysis of Poem "The Windhover" by Gerard Manley Hopkins | Owlcation

Rung upon the rein is a term used to describe the circle made by a horse when kept at pace on a tight rein, so the bird is able to use the rippling wing before moving off smoothly, ecstatically, somewhat like a skater rounding a bend.

The bird then beats back the strong wind which is uplifting for the speaker, in fact, so inspiring is the flight and aerial prowess of the falcon a transformation takes place. All the qualities of the kestrel in the whole airborne act, buckle, that is, collapse and then re-combine as one in a spiritual fire: This revelatory scene is both beautifully exquisite and thrilling - this is a different dimension, connected to the world of flesh and bone and earth yet transcending reality.

The speaker addresses the bird Christ as chevalier, a french word meaning knight or champion. Take the routine of the humble plough, even that can make the furrowed ridges shine and outwardly dull embers suddenly break and reveal this gorgeous golden red. The speaker is in awe of this everyday occurrence - a kestrel hovering then moving on against the wind - and likens the event to a wondrous religious experience.

The suggestion is that common things hold an almost mystical significance and are charged with potential.A sonnet is a poem in a specific form which originated in Italy; Giacomo da Lentini is credited with its invention..

While "Spring and Fall" is addressed "to a young child," we should first point out that this was not Gerard Manley Hopkins's own kid. He was a Jesuit priest, so he never had any children. In fact, he was such a devout Jesuit priest that he almost stopped writing poetry altogether. The common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is a bird of prey species belonging to the kestrel group of the falcon family urbanagricultureinitiative.com is also known as the European kestrel, Eurasian kestrel, or Old World urbanagricultureinitiative.com Britain, where no other kestrel species occurs, it is generally just called "the kestrel".. This species occurs over a large range. Hopkins and The Windhover The Windhover is one of the best known sonnets by Gerard Manley Hopkins and was inspired by the sight of a small falcon, a kestrel, which often faces against the wind to .

The term sonnet is derived from the Italian word sonetto (from Old Provençal sonet a little poem, from son song, from Latin sonus a sound). By the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure.

The poem “The Windhover, ” by Gerard Manley Hopkins, has a multitude of layers.

An analysis of the windhover a poem by gerard manley hopkins

First is the basic visual image: a bird is flying and diving down, while a man (possibly ploughing) watches. A summary of “The Windhover” in Gerard Manley Hopkins's Hopkins’s Poetry.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Hopkins’s Poetry and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Gerard Manley Hopkins was an awesome poet in spite of himself.

Here's what we mean by that: He wrote some verses here and there as a youngster, but then went through a phase as a young adult when he stopped writing poetry altogether. Finally (thank goodness) he started up again, but refused to publish. Talk about self-denial.

The speaker of the poem looks up and sees a windhover (another name for the common kestrel, which is a kind of falcon).

Windhovers have the ability to hover in place in the air while they scan the ground for prey. The speaker watches the windhover ride the wind like it's a horse, and then wheel. While "Spring and Fall" is addressed "to a young child," we should first point out that this was not Gerard Manley Hopkins's own kid.

He was a Jesuit priest, so he never had any children. In fact, he was such a devout Jesuit priest that he almost stopped writing poetry altogether.

The Windhover by Gerard Manley Hopkins: Summary and Critical Analysis